Profiles in Terrazzo: William Ketcham

Profiles in Terrazzo: William Ketcham

Profiles in Terrazzo

Ketcham

William Ketcham
Architect, Principal
Stantec Architecture Inc.

After earning his BArch at the University of Kentucky, Bill Ketcham moved to Chicago and has been working in architecture ever since. Ketcham started working with terrazzo almost from the onset of his professional career, and he is a great admirer of the product. “Terrazzo has an implicit quality, a timeless tradition,” stated Ketcham, “and it is sustainable when used with recycled content.” Ketcham has used terrazzo in a wide variety of projects, including Ravenswood Kinowerks and the Johnson Center at North Park University. The terrazzo floors in both also feature radiant heat.

Profiles in Terrazzo: William Ketcham
Ravenswood Kinowerks

One of his favorite projects is the Old Town School of Folk Music. The terrazzo floor in its public space has recycled content consisting of brown beer bottle glass, which symbolically links to the casual nature of the place and the type of music played there: Imagine people casually sitting around listening to and playing music while having a beer. “That was a fun project to do.”

Bill Ketcham understands the importance design plays in architecture, and that is one reason he likes terrazzo. Ketcham appreciates the plastic nature of terrazzo, which gives the designer significant latitude in design opportunities, much more so than with simple rectangular flooring options. And Ketcham points out that terrazzo is also durable, easy to maintain, easily fixed when damaged, and sustainable when using recycled content.

Profiles in Terrazzo: William Ketcham
Old Town School of Folk Music

Overall, Bill Ketcham loves the longevity and quality of terrazzo, and he aspires to incorporate it into all his projects. For instance, Ketcham has specified (not yet built) terrazzo for the radiant heating and cooling floors in a zero net energy project for the California Military Department.

Profiles in Terrazzo: Barbara Palm

Profiles in Terrazzo: Barbara Palm

Profiles in Terrazzo

Barbara Palm

Barbara Palm
Director of Interiors
Anderson Mikos Architects, LTD

When Barbara Palm of Anderson Mikos Architects first encountered terrazzo some 20 years ago during a hospital renovation, she was not at all familiar with the product and found the prospect of working with it a little daunting. There was a lot to learn about the product, such as the finishing process, and many aspects—both aesthetically and practically—had to be considered. It was a lot to take in. But it’s fair to say Barbara Palm is now a convert. She often recommends using terrazzo for large, heavy foot traffic areas.

Through her experience designing interiors for a wide range of medical facilities, Palm has come to favor terrazzo because it is durable, impervious (and therefore antimicrobial), stain resistant, and easy and inexpensive to maintain. But mostly Palm appreciates terrazzo because of the versatility it offers in colors and patterns. Terrazzo “really lets you run with it for creativity,” said Palm. “Terrazzo lets you push the boundaries of flooring.”

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Perhaps her favorite terrazzo project was the Operating Rooms and Main Lobby expansion project at Rush Copley Medical Center in Aurora, Illinois, which represented the culmination of years of Anderson Mikos design concepts and projects for Rush Copley. She first introduced the hospital to terrazzo for its Emergency Department Entrance and Waiting Area, which was then carried through the public corridor to the rest of the facility. The recent new Main Entrance and Lobby have become the jewel of the hospital.

Barbara Palm would like to see more in the way of terrazzo tiles that might make it easier to work in smaller areas. While a few manufacturers create such tiles, the tiles tend to be limited in color and look and don’t have the sparkle that comes from such add-ins as mother of pearl or glass. The tiles also lack differential sizing that would provide more depth.

106Rush

Palm believes the best creative results grow out of the designer and client collaborating as a team on the overall design. When it comes to that creativity, Palm suggests getting to know your terrazzo reps. They will give useful ideas about ways to use terrazzo to its best effect.

Terrazzo: The Geometry in Our Floors

Terrazzo: The Geometry in Our Floors

The Geometry in Our Floors

Geometry and shapes are all around us. Terrazzo provides the opportunity to mirror these shapes on the floor beneath our feet. By using lines and curves, a floor can guide us, inspire us, or pique our imagination. Take a look at “The Geometry in our Floors” as we showcase some of the possibilities of lines and curves.

Terrazzo: The Colors of Possibility

Devos Children's Hospital terrazzo colors

The Colors of Possibility

Terrazzo offers nearly limitless design possibilities. By customizing colors and aggregate combinations, spaces become one-of-a-kind. Whether you are looking for intricate multi-color designs, or seamless one-color designs, terrazzo offers it all. Take a look at “The Colors of Possibility” as we showcase all the colors of the rainbow.

Best of NCTA 2018

Time-tested terrazzo techniques show breadth, beauty, and versatility.

Best of NCTA 2018

Breadth, Beauty, Versatility

Each year, the North Central Terrazzo Association gathers to discuss advances in technology, to refine industry techniques, and to build camaraderie across our association. We seek to make time-tested terrazzo techniques even better.

We also look back at the projects completed by our association members that show the breadth, beauty, and versatility of terrazzo flooring. Many of these projects are award-winning designs and installations, and they include hospitals, colleges, research centers, sports arenas, transportation hubs, and churches.

Join us as we celebrate some of the finest projects the contractors of the North Central Terrazzo Association have created.

Terrazzo Takes Flight

Gerald R. Ford International Airport terrazzo floor design at the security checkpoint from NCTA

Terrazzo Takes Flight

Gerald R. Ford International Airport, Grand Rapids, MI

A flowing terrazzo design laid the groundwork for the $45 million Gateway Transformation Project. The architects used the powerful terrazzo design, combined with lighting, to streamline the space and direct passengers through design.

The design radiates from the new consolidated security checkpoint sweeping down the corridors through the retail spaces to the departure gates. The terrazzo pattern ties together amenities, play areas, and exhibits creating a comfortable space to await your next flight. The cool color palette and ambient lighting brings calmness to this bustling transportation hub.

Not only does the pattern complement the overall project design, its durability and longevity made terrazzo a natural choice to meet demands of the high-traffic space. The flooring will maintain its radiance and integrity over time, even with heavy usage. Passengers can rush to their gates, Skycap services can ride through the halls, and airline crew can smoothly wheel their luggage to their next flight seamlessly without impact to this beautiful design.

After another record-breaking year for passenger numbers at Gerald R. Ford International airport, terrazzo strength is critical.

Click to view larger.

PROJECT NAME: Gerald R. Ford International Airport – Consolidated Checkpoint and Marketplace
OWNER/CLIENT: Gerald R. Ford International Airport
TERRAZZO CONTRACTOR: Central Tile & Terrazzo Co., Inc.
ARCHITECT: Alliiance (Minneapolis, MN)
GENERAL CONTRACTOR: The Christman Company (Grand Rapids, MI)
EPOXY SUPPLIER: Sherwin Williams
DIVIDER STRIP SUPPLIER: Manhattan American
TEMPLATE/STENCILS: Creative Edge Master Shop
PHOTOGRAPHY: Viken Djaferian, FotoGrafix

Gerald R. Ford International Airport terrazzo floor design from NCTA

The Spirit of Louisville

Louisville airport terrazzo pattern by the airport shops

The Spirit of Louisville

Louisville International Airport, Louisville, KY

When you walk through the Louisville International Airport, the spirit of the city unfolds in a cultural treasure trove, mapped on the airport’s award-winning terrazzo floor.

The energy of the race comes through with bold patterns of horseshoes, silks, and jockey helmets. You can get a glimpse of a flying horse in the night sky with a celestial inlay of the Pegasus constellation.

Vibrant fleurs-de-lis bring in elements of the city seal and the Louisville heritage. Louisville Sluggers radiate in starburst patterns. Bourbon barrels form playful spheres. Violins delicately shadow the floor.

Not only will you find the themes that share the air of Louisville, you will find striking and sophisticated linear patterns with cool colors that welcome you to the departure gates.

As part of a $9.5 million Terminal Enhancement Project, the terrazzo design covers main floors, corridors, and stairwells. Overall, the design used 31,000 linear feet of divider strip and 32 colors of epoxy terrazzo. Each color shines and each inlay sparkles in this intricate design that brings the spirit of Louisville to the millions of travelers that walk through this terminal.

The design and installation won a prestigious 2018 Honor Award from the National Terrazzo and Mosaic Association (NTMA).

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PROJECT NAME: Louisville International Airport Terminal Enhancement Project
OWNER/CLIENT: Louisville Regional Airport Authority (Louisville, KY)
TERRAZZO CONTRACTOR: Rosa Mosaic & Tile Company (Louisville, KY)
ARCHITECT: Alliiance (Minneapolis, MN) and Stengel Hill Architecture (Louisville, KY)
GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Wehr Constructors Inc. (Louisville, KY)
EPOXY RESIN SUPPLIER: Key Resin Company (Batavia, OH)
DIVIDER STRIP SUPPLIER: Manhattan American Terrazzo Strip Company (Staley, NC)
AGGREGATE SUPPLIERS: Arim, Inc.; Klein & Company; Terrazzo & Marble Supply Companies
PHOTOGRAPHY: Tim Furlong Jr.

long corridor with terrazzo flooring in Louisville International Airport terminal

Wayfinding: Designs that Guide

terrazzo flooring design adventist amita cancer institute

Wayfinding

Designs that Guide

Wayfinding systems guide people—they provide a visual experience to make complex spaces easier to navigate.

Terrazzo is especially suited for helping patients orient to large healthcare facilities, students navigate from one classroom to another, and travelers find their way in airports.

Adventist Cancer Institute is a case in point. Its poured in place terrazzo floor features a “compass of meaning” and “ribbons of hope” mentioned in the Institute’s mission statement.

“The colors of the ribbons correspond with the colors of the points on the compass, which represent peace, hope, faith, and love,” said Abby Weilmuenster, senior interior designer at Earl Swensson Associates. “And while they’re decorative, they’re also wayfinding (guides) for visitors and patients.”

The design at the Nicholas Conservatory & Gardens drew inspiration from the winding Rock River. Designer and artist Linda Beaumont describes how the design brings each visitor on a journey. “The composition of the entire floor suggests water, with additional sinuous lines of river currents adding color and rhythm. The bits and pieces of glass bring a presence of the movement of the river, swirling and pulling all the different shapes through the Conservatory lobby, and into the magical world of exotic plants seen in the distance.”

Terrazzo “takes your design factor to another level,” says Kenny Stanfield, partner at Sherman Carter Barnhart, architects for Brooks Elementary. With the design freedom and vast color palette of terrazzo, designers and architects can create wayfinding to direct wherever they want visitors to go.

Planes, Trains, and Terrazzo

terrazzo floor

Planes, Trains, and Terrazzo

 

Where there’s travel, there’s great terrazzo!

With its easy clean up and time-tested durability, terrazzo is the perfect material for airports and train stations. The wide color selection and material flexibility of terrazzo give designers the freedom to craft the best designs to welcome passengers as they board and exit. Not to mention that the smoothness of gleaming, polished terrazzo floors makes pulling luggage a whole lot easier.

From the rich, multi-colored nature designs at the Cleveland airport to the iconic storytelling designs of the Uptown train station in Normal, Illinois, to the vibrant, colorful flooring at the Lambert-St. Louis international airport, we’ve rounded-up some of the most captivating terrazzo travel creations that the Midwest has to offer. We hope our video will spark ideas for your next airport or train station design. We wish you happy holiday season!